Annual Seedy Saturday, Seed Swap Event

We will be holding our annual seed and seedling swap event at the Community Garden and Orchard at The Temp on Gravel Lane. Between 11am and 2.30 pm on Saturday 25th April. There is an opportunity to bring along surplus vegetable seeds and seedlings to swap for someone else’s surplus! Children can get involved helping to plant out the raised beds that were so productive last year. There will also be plant stalls, practical composting advice and activities for children and adults – try welly throwing, log stacking, bug hunting and much more! Cake and refreshments will be available.

Plant Stall 2014

Seed Stall 2014

Getting ready for planting 2014

Getting ready for planting 2014

Advertisements

Lindow Moss Exhibition

Thanks to all who voted for us in our bid to win funding in the Skipton Building Society’s ‘Grass Roots Giving’ community programme. We were successful!

We are grateful to Skipton’s generosity, enabling us to follow up the successful Lindow Moss Day School at Wilmslow Guild with an exhibition at Wilmslow Library. This is showing on the gallery during Library opening hours until Saturday 31 January 2015.

photophoto_2

The exhibition launches Transition Wilmslow’s ‘A New Vision for Lindow Moss, highlighting its historic and environmental importance.

It is one of the most significant peatland landscapes in Britain, yet it remains abused, neglected and officially unrecognised. Transition Wilmslow and our partners are coming together as the Lindow Moss Partnership, and creating a vision to restore, conserve, and celebrate this unique landscape.

Why not take a break from your shopping, enjoy the warmth of Wilmslow Library and learn more about Transition Wilmslow and our Vision for Lindow Moss!

See the report on the Day School at http://tinyurl.com/ofue6fu

Wilmslow Library opening times here http://tinyurl.com/prlqesp

Pressure Grows for Restoration of Lindow Moss

Pressure is growing for urgent action to be taken to preserve and restore Lindow Moss and provide a fitting memorial to Lindow Man, following a recent day school on “Lindow Moss: Origins and Future Prospects”. The event was organised by Transition Wilmslow and the Wilmslow Guild on 18th October. Photographs taken by Garry Kershaw, Heather Calderbank and Ali Berry.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Over 60 people including local residents and students from the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University were absorbed by contributions from a range of experts including Rick Turner, the former Cheshire County Council Archaeologist who found Lindow Man 30 years ago this year.

There was a special guest keeping watch over proceedings in the form of a reconstructed bronze head of Lindow Man which was kindly loaned for the day.

Presentations covered the evolution and history of Lindow Moss and the processes that could be used to restore the area which is currently used for peat extraction. Several speakers underlined why the restoration of this historic, ecologically important and recreation friendly local asset is now critical. During lunch attendees were able to explore exhibitions by local groups including a display from Wilmslow Library on local maps, books and other reference material; and experience, firsthand, investigative techniques such as peat coring, and pollen analysis.

Rick Turner, in an inspirational and amusing talk, recounted his involvement in the discovery of Lindow Man from his first telephone call from a local newspaper reporter through to his work with the British Museum on the exhumation, examination and preservation of his body. He reminded us of the local and wider significance of Lindow Man. It was an archaeological discovery of international significance, with some of the forensic techniques used to investigate him now evident in CSI Miami and Silent Witness! In his concluding comments Rick made an impassioned plea for Lindow Moss to be returned to an area that Lindow Man would recognise.

Attendees also heard from a volunteer on the restored Whixall Moss in Shropshire. His pride in what they had achieved in providing a valuable resource for local residents was evident to all.

Professor John Handley from Transition Wilmslow, who chaired the day school, thanked all speakers and presenters for their insight into the past and future of Lindow Moss. He emphasised the importance of Lindow Moss for its ecological importance both locally and as part of a wider network of mosses in the North West but also as a means of reducing carbon emissions and its importance to local residents. He urged that the momentum to restore the moss not be lost.

The overall mood of the day was aptly captured in the words of one contributor “Peat extraction has left little of the original peatland.   We must act soon. Today has shown that there is head of steam from local people, agencies and academic institutions to restore this area. It is an enormous opportunity which we must grasp”

We Want Your Vote For Wilmslow!

 Two Wilmslow groups shortlisted for community funding

Great news!  Skipton Building Society ‘Grassroots Giving Campaign’ have 161 grants of £500 each for projects that enhance local communities – and Transition Wilmslow and Wilmslow Community Archaeology have been shortlisted for entry into the final voting stage!

Voting opened on 1st September and runs until mid October.  You can vote for any of the shortlisted projects by clicking on http://www.skiptongrg.co.uk/ and see the amazing work going on across the country.  Vote for both of the Wilmslow contenders and you will be supporting their work to improve our local environment.

If successful, we at Transition Wilmslow would use the funding to help local people understand more about the amazing landscape on their doorstep, in particular Lindow Moss, an area of exceptional archaeological and ecological significance. The funds would help to pay for a mobile exhibition of photographs with explanatory text that could tour schools, churches and community spaces. This would support a campaign to restore the moss, to protect the landscape, provide access for walkers, cyclists and those with disabilities, and provide an educational resource and a green lung for Wilmslow. Transition Wilmslow have already held a workshop for interested groups, and had a very successful Dawn walk on 2nd August with more than 40 local people to celebrate the discovery of the body of Lindow Man.

Vote for Transition Wilmslow on http://www.skiptongrg.co.uk/apply-for-funding/whos-applying/north-west/transition-wilmslow/.

Thank you!

Also why not book your place on the Day School ‘Lindow Moss: Origins and Future Prospects’ at the Wilmslow Guild with Professor John Handley, Saturday, 18 October 2014?  For more information and booking details see page 62 of the Wilmslow Guild Prospectus

Lindow Moss Dawn Walk: Report and photos

Lindow Moss is a site of immense archeological and ecological significance, and Transition Wilmslow is at the centre of an exciting venture to restore it as a place of recreation, exercise and learning for local people. As part of a series of events to raise awareness of the importance of the Moss, we had a Dawn walk on the 2nd August led by John Handley. As well as evocative readings about the Moss and Lindow Man, we joined the Wildwood seed group in their moving celebration of our Bog Ancestors, the people who lived and died on the Moss.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photographs from the Lindow Moss dawn walk taken by Chris Hill.

There’s more coverage of the anniversary of the discovery of Lindow Man (and our work) on wilmslow.co.uk. And also a piece on the BBC website.

Next up is our Day School at Wilmslow Guild on 18th October! If you are interested in helping with the Lindow Moss work, please contact us.