Lindow Moss: Planning Decision December 2018

It was with great reluctance that Transition Wilmslow supported the building of homes on the Green Belt. However, it was considered that the special circumstances of preventing the Moss being filled with inert waste and turned over agriculture, realising the end to peat extraction and the successful restoration of the Moss were more important. John Handley spoke with passion and conviction in support of the applications (Lindow Moss Statement 150016MLindow Moss Statement 150064M. Following a 5-year restoration programme there will be a 20-year aftercare period.     Transition Wilmslow’s request for a Restoration Committee to oversee the restoration and aftercare was not successful. However, a Liaison Panel is to be established to monitor the restoration work. Details have yet to agreed.  Transition Wilmslow will be supporting strong agency and local community involvement on this committee to ensure oversight of both the restoration process and delivery of the associated benefits of restoration to support the important ecological, archaeological and recreation benefits at local, regional and national scales. The committee also discussed the provision of a financial bond to secure the work and the possibility of restoration work commencing before the development of the new homes.  We still await final confirmation of this being included in the associated conditions to the approvals. As the application for the demolition of existing buildings and provision of 14 new dwellings at the peat processing site (15/0016M ) is considered an inappropriate form of development in the Green Belt it  will need to referred to the Secretary of State for approval. (Jean Hill).

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2018 Transition Wilmslow Lecture

We had a full house at The Wilmslow Guild for Professor Sarah Bridle’s lecture on food and it’s impact on climate change, and plenty of people brave enough to try freeze dried  meal worms and crickets! Sarah is Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Manchester, and told us about her work  using big data analysis techniques to calculate the greenhouse gas emissions and nutrition of our food choices. Beef, lamb and dairy products contribute most to climate change, and changing our diets can really make a difference. There were some horrifying statistics about the impact of food waste too! Sarah’s slides are on her project website http://www.ggdot.org (scroll down to the bottom) and you are invited to put your details on the “join us” section to receive project updates so eventually you will be able to accurately track the impact of your daily food choices on the climate!

Wilmslow Walks: Feedback and Plans for 2018

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We have been looking at the feedback from the people who joined us on our Wilmslow Walks last year. More than 120 children and around 100 adults joined us on walks on Lindow Moss, learning more about the extraordinary historical, archeological and ecological landscape literally on our doorstep. We also enjoyed spending time walking in Meriton Park (including the Transition Wilmslow orchard) with members of the Time Out group. These walks were made possible by a CEC Participatory Budgetary Scheme to improve public health, by encouraging people to enjoy the outdoors. The children’s feedback has provided the basis for this word cloud, demonstrating how much they learned in a 90 minute walk around the Moss. Thank you to John Handley for leading the walks, to Denise, Jane, Jean, Pippa, Garry, Anthony and Helen for leading the children’s walks, and to Jean and Heather who are putting together maps for everyone to use.

We are offering another programme of walks for children this summer, and another of our famous Lindow Moss Dawn walks in September. We also have two more foraging walks planned: check our diary page and wilmslow.co.uk for details!

Tomorrow The Film!

On 18 January 2018, 41 people came along to The Old Dancer in Wilmslow for food, drink and a showing of the inspirational film Tomorrow, featuring the Transition Network’s very own Rob Hopkins.

The film follows the filmmakers Cyril Dion and Mélanie Laurent, together with a team of four people, on a journey through ten different countries to figure out what issues may lead to global environmental disaster and what we can do to avoid it. During their journey, they meet those who are re-inventing agriculture, energy, economy, democracy and education and began to figure out what could be tomorrow’s world…

We filmed some of the reactions to the film: here. We also asked people to think about what they might do differently as a result of seeing the film, and they made these pledges:

Use small local traders more often

Buy less plastic packaging

If we can have a local currency (Wilmslow Pound) I will support it and use it wherever possible

Find out about our nearest junk Food Cafes

Buy more locally  Grow stuff in my garden (try to!)

Suggest to Heatons Sustainability Group that they organise a showing of this film

Think small scale local and don’t dismiss my own efforts

Create and work a vegetable patch in my own garden thinking of biodiversity and using eco friendly products

I will pass on the need for action now to my children to give them a better future and to ask them to do the same

Make a veggie garden at my school

Intercrop the veg in my garden       Cycle Plan for Wilmslow

Support development of a local currency  Be more community aware

Take an active role in a community project

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If you would like to host a showing of Tomorrow to your community group or church, contact the Transition Network or search the Tomorrow website.

Thank you to everyone at The Old Dancer for looking after us and the fantastic food and drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save our oceans, anyone?

If you have watched Blue Planet 2, you will have seen the heart breaking scenes of mammals asphyxiating on plastic, and heard about the effect that micro plastics are having on our oceans. There seems to be some government action at last, with a World Ocean Summit in March, and a UK Government consultation on a plastic bottle deposit scheme. The effect of plastic bag reduction in the UK demonstrates that we can change our behaviour for the better,  with an 83% reduction in bag use since the 5p charge was introduced, so surely we can do the same with plastic bottles? Our friends at Transition New Mills are implementing a plastic strategy for New Mills, working with local retailers who offer to fill peoples’ own reusable water bottles for free….could we do the same here? Could you and your children cope without plastic straws? Are paper or biodegradable ones acceptable substitutes? We would like to raise awareness of the problem of plastic pollution, particularly from single use plastics here in Wilmslow….how should we do that? would you like to help? let us know if you have any ideas!

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Plastic Bottle awareness on a trip to Kenya!

Chris Baines gives the second Transition Wilmslow Lecture

We were delighted to host Professor Chris Baines at the Wilmslow Guild on 24th November. He gave a beautifully illustrated talk on wildlife gardening, green infrastructure and its importance in our towns and cities. We followed up with a workshop on green infrastructure  hosted by John Handley with Nerys Jones and Chris, where we discussed how we could improve green infrastructure within the Neighbourhood Plan. We have another brilliant speaker for our third lecture in 2018, so watch this space!