Anything but a Bog Standard Landscape…

A New Vision for Lindow Moss

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On Thursday 3rd April, Transition Wilmslow hosted a workshop to bring people together and discuss a new way forward for Lindow Moss.  Over 50 people attended, from local councillors, to English Heritage, Cheshire Wildlife Trust, Manchester Museum, Environment Agency, and other interested parties.

Professor John Handley talked about the formation of the Moss (a much bigger area than that known as Lindow Common), and how the exploitation of the peat for fuel from the Middle Ages onwards created distinctive field boundaries called moss ‘rooms’. He described it as “one of the best preserved landscapes of its type in Britain and yet, astonishingly, it is not protected by designation of any kind.”

Tony Evans, Chair of the Saltersley Common Preservation Society (covering Lindow Moss), also addressed the group.  We heard about the apparent infringements of the planning conditions by the peat extraction companies, leading to a lowering of the water table, and effects including near-disappearance of wildlife such as water voles, and subsidence of houses in the area.

Groups looked at education, landscape restoration and heritage, access and usage, and ecology to identify possible steps to restore the Moss and were reminded that this year is the 30th anniversary of the finding of Lindow Man. The building buzzed with lively conversation.

The participants agreed a New Vision for Lindow Moss and that we would try to work collaboratively to bring about the project.

For Transition Wilmslow, the project brings together many of the strands that they are about: local community, biodiversity, food, education, carbon, resilience and legacy for future generations.  For more information please visit the Lindow Moss pages.

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